FEATURED ARTISTS

2017 MIDWEST PHOTO EMERGE FELLOWSHIP AWARD

GISELLE NOELLE MORGAN

SALT LAKE CITY, UT

2017 HOT NEW PIC AWARD

CHARLES HIVELY,

BROOKLYN, NY


2018 MIDWEST PHOTO EMERGE FELLOWSHIP AWARD

MOLLY McCALL,

MONTEREY, CA


LUKE JORDAN

2017 DEVELOPED WORK FELLOWSHIP AWARD

ANDY JOHNSTON

2018 MWCP JURIED EXHIBITION PEOPLE CATEGORY AWARD

DOUGLAS HILL

2018 MWCP JURIED EXHIBITION PLACES CATEGORY AWARD

DAVE CONKLING

2018 MWCP JURIED EXHIBITION STILL-LIFE CATEGORY AWARD

NATALIE WEBER

2018 MWCP JURIED EXHIBITION ABSTRACT CATEGORY AWARD

MICHAEL ELENKO

2018 MWCP JURIED EXHIBITION CONCEPT CATEGORY AWARD

NOTHING COMES FROM NOTHING


"Nothing comes from Nothing", is a reimagining of past stories discovered in Super 8mm films and found photographs. Her interest lies in the investigation of the relationships between the passage of time, memory, repetition and loss, including reappearance and forgetting. The imagery is a diverse collection of composites, recreating layers and fragments of the past similar to the way memory is created, stored and recalled. She is searching for the balance between truth and fiction and seeking to reconcile that uncertainty.

When choosing images for her work, she imagines that she is the camera, and her mind selects the images just as if she was taking the photos with a camera - the exposure, the subject, the composition, all are considered and adjusted. She utilizes references to identity, a sense of place, and history to explore themes of humanity, loss, and lonliness. Water and nature appear in much of her work as reference to the cycle of life and the infinite power of renewal.

The title of this series is referred to in many literary sources - The Bible, Shakespeare, Classic philosophy, theatre, film, and music. These varied references include the idea that existence is infinite succession of moments, and even with no change, there is temporal change. She is keenly interested in the altering of memory over time, and the subsequent narrative that speaks hauntingly to the present.

PROFANE ILLUMINATION


In the protracted historical course of hysteria - a disease akin to the wast basket of medicine - there lives a vexing intersection between Freud's era of the hysterics and the ever-present stigmatization of women with disabilities being hapharzardly deemed as deranged or broken. This collection emanated its research and critique from the original albumen and lithographic images by Paul Régnard from the Salpetriére Hospital in Paris, France in the late 1880's. "Profane Illumination" is a visual homage to the incarcerated female patients who were labeled as hysterical for past sexual trauma, chronic illness, and epilepsy. Through the vessel of self-portraiture, these photographs redact th sanctioning authority stemming from the voyeuristic and fetishistic masculine gaze and instead attempt to reclaim the intersection between illness and femininity.

The aim for this series was to create a visual relationship to a historically fractured medical system that has commodified exualized illness among women. The corporeal body acts as the medium and the material, subverting Andreé Breton's concept that the hysterical emale form is akin to and "exquisite cadaver". Photographically, the double exposures evoke clonic and tonic epileptic mothions that were noted from the Salpetriére . This collection consciously converges the poses from Régnard's portraits of the imprisoned female patients with a personal performance-for-camera centered around convulsive and violent dysmenorrhea. "Profane Illumination" is a rejection to the fetishization of women as medical muses and is an encouragement for dabled women to 'take up space' in an ableist environment.

2016 MIDWEST PHOTO EMERGE FELLOWSHIP AWARD

MAGGIE MEINERS

WINNETKA, IL

I HEAR WITH MY EYES


She felt isolated as a kid. She's always assumed that it was because of the profound hearing loss she developed as a result of continuous ear infections and susequent surgeries. Not being able to hear made her feel left out - of the conversation, of the gossip, of the joke. To make sense of her silenced world, she tried to find ways to compensate while proving to herself that she belonged. Visual cues provided that bridge. Lip reading, body language, gestures, the clothes people wore and the objects with which they surrounded themselves were like pieces of a puzzle. She continues to rely on these cues to help make sense of the world from which she came and of which she is still a part.

While her state-of-the-art hearing aids capture sound, she still relies heavily on the visual world for clarification and direction. This body of work encompasses the various visual cues that, like totems, certify her sense of belonging. Whether it is a father and son walking together or people playing cards, she feels connected by these components, using them as signposts to point her in the direction of self in concert with the world in which she finds herself.

2016 HOT NEW PIC AWARD

AMANDA QUEVEDO,

BETHLEHEM, PA


2018 HOT NEW PICS SHOW AWARD

AMY ANDERSON,

MINNEAPOLIS, MN


2018 DEVELOPED WORK FELLOWSHIP AWARD

ERIC KUNSMAN,

ROCHESTER, NY